EMERALD MINES - GREENE COUNTY, PA


The Emerald Mine was near Clarksville, PA, and is not the same Emerald Mine as the current RAG-Emerald at Waynesburg. Here is a photo of all that's left of the Emerald Mine tipple. When the railroad was removed and a bike trail put in it's place, most of the tipple was demolished. But this portion going down to the barge loadout on the Monongahela River remains. (Jun. 2004 image by author)


When a tornado destroyed the original patch housing for the Emerald Mine in 1940, Emerald Coal and Coke built the Burson patch, shown here, to house the miners and their families. (Thanks to Greene County coal historian Lonnie Miller for the information) (Mar. 2003 image by author)


Braden was another section of company-built housing for employees of the Emerald Mine, and is probably the last coal patch to be constructed in Pennsylvania. (Mar. 2003 image by author)

SOME OF THE LAST COAL COMPANY TOWNS TO BE BUILT IN APPALACHIA

1929-Clearco, WV

1929-Pitt Gas, PA

1930-Bishop, WV/VA

1934-Wyoming, WV

1937-Keen Mountain, VA

1938-Kopperston, WV

1940-Burson/Braden, PA

1940-Marianna, WV

Early 1940's-Wharton/Barrett/Clinton, WV

1947-Munson, WV

1947-Keokee, VA (reconstructed)

1952-New Camp (Pound), VA

1968-Hunting Hills, WV

1981-Buchanshire, VA (Evidently Island Creek Coal never actually constructed this town that they planned to build.)


Another section of Emerald Mine housing is called Chartiers Hill. (Image by others)


A Norfolk-Southern train winds past the spot where the Edwards shaft of the Emerald mine used to be located. (Mar. 2003 image by author)


Arial photo showing the arrangement of Emerald Mine housing. (Image by others)

From the Aug. 26, 1975 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - "...There is more coal mining activity in Greene County than ever before in its hisotry," says Stephen McCann, executive vice president of the Western Pennsylvania Coal Operators Association and a resident of Carmichaels. "From 1975 to 1985, under present plans, it is believed there will be in the neighborhood of eight new mines opening up," says McCann. Total coal production and employemtn in the mines are both expected to double in the next 15 years, he adds. That would mean about 5,000 more mining jobs. What caused the big resurgence in interest in Greene County coal? "This is the largest reserve field of underground coal in the eastern U.S.," McCann says, pointing on a map to an area that includes all of Greene County and the southern half of Washington County. Big steel and coal companies have owned coal rights that weren't exercised until now because lower sulfur coal was available, and in many cases, it was closer to the Monongahela River ..."


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