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CRUCIBLE, PA

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Overall view of the ruins of the Crucible coal processing plant that existed until a few years ago. (Image courtesy of Mather Recovery Systems LLC)


Tipple ruins at Crucible, Pa. had no provisions for loading trains, so they must have shipped all their coal by barge on the river to the Crucible Steel Co. coke ovens and steel mill at Midland, Pa. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


The original Crucible tipple and headframe (Image courtesy Coal and Coke Heritage Center, Penn State Fayette)


This part of the Crucible tipple was not concrete, and appears to have been steel-framed. That looks like typical steel sheeting on the sides, but is actually asbestos siding. (Circa 1930 "Keystone Coal Mining Catalog" image)


What may have once been a Dorr thickener at Crucible. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


Crucible was operated by Crucible Coal Co., a subsidiary of Crucible Steel Co. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


This old boiler house was probably built when the mine opened. Some sources have stated that the mine opened in 1911, but it wasn't until 1913 that Uniontown coal property speculator J.V. Thompson sold the 2,000 acres of coal lands to the Crucible Steel. Co. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


The Crucible boiler house as it looked when the mine was active. (Image courtesy Coal and Coke Heritage Center, Penn State Fayette)


Another Crucible mine building, on the banks of the Monongahela River, this one is probably a bathhouse or machine shop. These interesting mine ruins still existed when I took this photo, but all that is there now is a boring grassy field. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


These large gob piles are across the Mon River from the Crucible coal processing complex. The mine was closed in the early 1960's. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


The Crucible patch is up on the hill above the tipple site. Over 1300 people lived here in the late 1940's. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


Larger 2-family company housing at Crucible, Pa. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


A smaller type of one family homes that the company built for its workers. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


Row of miners' cottages at Crucible. At least part of the patch was constructed by the Fort Pitt Bridge Company. (Circa 1930 "Keystone Coal Mining Catalog" image)


The old United Mine Workers union hall at Crucible. (Aug. 2002 image by author)


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