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DUO, WV

Duo is located in Big Clear Creek Valley. It was originally a farmstead for two families, hence the name Duo. Later, brothers Thomas and John Raine came to Fayette and Greenbrier Counties looking for timber and coal lands. When they purchased most of the Duo farm they kept the name. Development of the Duo coal camp and coal mine by the Raine Lumber & Coal Co. probably began in 1928-29, and Raine shipped the first coal in 1933. Mining was in the Sewell seam of coal, and the mines were closed in 1958.

In the 1960's Duo Coals, Inc. mined at Duo. From 1987 until 1989 Thurman Coal operated a small deep mine on the hill above Duo. In the 21st Century a few people are still calling Duo home. Most of the original company houses are still extant, but I couldn't find any remnants of the tipple or mine, only BIG reclaimed strip mine lands.


An aerial view of Duo. With only about 20 homes Duo was a relatively small coal camp. Most of the homes are still in existence, though. (Image from Willis Franco via Bill Richmond)


Remaining coal camp homes at Duo. (April 2001 image by author)


Larger two story company houses originally built for mine formen. (2006 image by BHS Environmental via FWS)


Looking down a street in Duo with houses for foremen on the left and houses for miners on the right. (2006 image by BHS Environmental via FWS)


This was the boarding house, or "club house." (2006 image by BHS Environmental via FWS)


Duo baptist church. (2006 image by BHS Environmental via FWS)


Remains of coal mining at Duo. (1996 State Historic Preservation Office image)


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